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Drug Combo Slows Heart Decline In Muscular Dystrophy

A NEW STUDY IS OUT THAT OFFERS NEW HOPE TO PATIENTS WITH DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY, OR D-M-D.

RESEARCHERS TESTED A COMBINATION OF HEART DRUGS THAT HAVE BEEN ON THE MARKET FOR YEARS AND FOUND THEY MAY HAVE A NEW USE WHEN IT COMES TO D-M-D. 

PATIENTS WERE GIVEN A CARDIAC M-R-I, WHICH ALLOWED DOCTORS TO DETECT THE VERY FIRST SIGNS OF HEART DAMAGE IN DUCHENNE PATIENTS. ONCE THAT DAMAGE WAS SPOTTED, THEY GAVE HALF OF THE STUDY PARTICIPANTS A DRUG KNOWN AS EPLERENONE (pronounced: uh-PLAIR-uh-known).  THE OTHER HALF RECEIVED A PLACEBO. WHEN PAIRED WITH OTHER COMMONLY USED HEART MEDICATIONS, DOCTORS SAY THE DRUG THERAPY SLOWED DAMAGE TO THE HEARTS OF D-M-D PATIENTS DRAMATICALLY. 

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Joe Rosenthal, MD

Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

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Doctors Dealing With Dramatic Rise In Falls

Clinic helps prevent falls - now the leading cause of accidental death in older patients

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) December 2014 – The numbers are staggering. Every 13 seconds an older person falls in the U.S. and has to be rushed to a hospital emergency department for treatment. It happens nearly two and a half million times a year, twice the rate as just a decade ago and, even worse, fatal falls are skyrocketing.

 

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Marcie Bockbrader, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Neurorehabilitation
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation
  • Cognitive science
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Device Controls Brain Activity To Maximize Therapy

Magnets send pulses through scalp, into patient’s brain to “prep” for therapy

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) November 2014 – In an effort to help patients more fully recover from stroke, researchers are using a novel device that allows them to control a patient’s brain activity prior to therapy.  “Often what happens after a stroke is that the healthy side tends to overcompensate for the injured side,” said Dr. Marcie Bockbrader, who is leading the study at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.  When that happens, the body may not receive clear enough messages from the injured of the brain telling it how to function properly.

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