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Therapists @OSUWexMed help design a video game thatís revolutionizing rehab. Details: bit.ly/15IV0DP  
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Meet the Expert

Dr. Lynne Gauthier


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How Video Games Are Revolutionizing Rehab

Studies show patients often get better faster during game play

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) November 2013 – Often decried by parents as a waste of a child’s time, video games are increasingly finding favor with older generations and the medical providers who treat them.

In a unique collaboration, clinicians, computer scientists, an electrical engineer and a biomechanist have teamed up with physical therapists at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to create a video game that is showing promise in patients undergoing rehabilitation for stroke.

“We’ve seen clinically significant improvements in our patients’ motor function,” said Lynne Gauthier, PhD, a physical therapist who helped design the game. “Other games have been developed for rehab, but not in conjunction with clinicians,” she said.

This particular game makes use of what’s known as constraint-induced movement therapy. In the comfort of their own home, patients put a mitt on their healthy hand to prevent them from using it, and a glove with sensors on the other. Using only their affected hand, patients row an avatar down a river, picking up litter and fending off bats along the way.

“It’s amazing,” said Nancy Henckle, a stroke survivor. “I get so caught up in the game, I forget how hard I’m working,” she said.

To see the game in action, click on the video box to the left. To read the press release, “click to read more” link below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESEARCHERS DEVELOP AT-HOME 3D VIDEO GAME FOR STROKE PATIENTS

 COLUMBUS, Ohio – Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have developed a therapeutic at-home gaming program for stroke patients who experience motor weakness affecting 80 percent of survivors.

Hemiparesis affects 325,000 individuals each year, according to the National Stroke Association. It is defined as weakness or the inability to move one side of the body, and can be debilitating as it impacts everyday functions such as eating, dressing or grabbing objects.

Constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy) is an intense treatment recommended for stroke survivors, and improves motor function, as well as the use of impaired upper extremities. However, less than 1 percent of those affected by hemiparesis receives the beneficial therapy.

“Lack of access, transportation and cost are contributing barriers to receiving CI therapy. To address this disparity, our team developed a 3D gaming system to deliver CI therapy to patients in their homes,” said Lynne Gauthier, assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation in Ohio State’s College of Medicine.

Gauthier, also principal investigator of the study and a neuroscientist, is collaborating with a multi-disciplinary team comprised of clinicians, computer scientists, an electrical engineer and a biomechanist to design an innovative video game incorporating effective ingredients CI therapy.

For a combined 30 hours over the course of two weeks, the patient-gamer is immersed in a river canyon environment, where he or she receives engaging high repetition motor practice targeting the affected hand and arm. Various game scenarios promote movements that challenge the stroke survivor and are beneficial to recovery. Some examples include: rowing and paddling down a river, swatting away bats inside a cave, grabbing bottles from the water, fishing, avoiding rocks in the rapids, catching parachutes containing supplies and steering to capture treasure chests. Throughout the intensive training schedule, the participant wears a padded mitt on the less affected hand for 10 hours daily, to promote the use of the more affected hand.

To ensure that motor gains made through the game carry over to daily life, the game encourages participants to reflect on their daily use of the weaker arm and engages the gamer in additional problem-solving ways of using the weaker arm for daily activities.

“This novel model of therapy has shown positive results for individuals who have played the game. Gains in motor speed, as measured by the Wolf Motor Function Test, rival those made through traditional CI therapy,” said Gauthier. “It provides intense high quality motor practice for patients, in their own homes. Patients have reported they have more motivation, time goes by quicker and the challenges are exciting and not so tedious.”

Gauthier said that, if this initial trial demonstrates sufficient evidence of efficacy in stroke survivors, future expansion of gaming CI therapy is possible for other patients with traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and multiple sclerosis.

Along with Gauthier, other Ohio State researchers involved in the study are Alexandra Borstad, Lise Worthen-Chaudhari, Roger Crawfis, David Maung, Ryan McPherson, Joshua Adams, Jana Jaffe and Amelia Siles. Linda Lowes from Nationwide Children’s Hospital is also a co-investigator on the research.

The study is funded through a grant by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

 

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Images

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Video games are helping to revolutionize rehab.
Nancy Henckle of Delaware, OH undergoes rehabilitation for a stroke by playing a video game developed at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Developers say this is one of the first games for rehab to use design input from therapists and patients. Early tests showed that patients logged an average of more than 1,500 movements per hour while playing the game, helping them to become more functional and flexible. Details here: bit.ly/15IV0DP
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Video games allow many patients to undergo rehab at home.
A therapist fits Nancy Henckle with a specialized glove for a rehabilitation session using a specially designed video game. Experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center designed the game to allow more patients like Nancy to take part in rehab from the comfort of their own homes. Details here: bit.ly/15IV0DP
/newmedia/mcp/osunch/2013/nov13/athometherapy/8-Images/1-Photos/03_Glove_closeup.jpg
A specially designed glove helps patients gain strength and mobility in hands affected by stroke.
Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are testing a video game that helps rehabilitate patients after strokes and brain injuries. This glove is lined with sensors that interact with a video game developed with the input of therapists and patients. See how it works here: bit.ly/15IV0DP
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Therapists test an interactive game designed to rehabilitate patients after stroke or brain injuries.
Lynne Gauthier, PhD, left, fits a specialized glove onto the hand of an assistant at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Gauthier helped develop a video game designed to allow patients to rehabilitate hands and arms affected by a stroke in the comfort of their own homes. Details: bit.ly/15IV0DP
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Therapists join forces with game developers to find new options for rehabilitation.
Lynne Gauthier, PhD, helped to develop a video game at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center that will help patients rehabilitate their arms and hands after strokes or brain injuries. Early tests showed that patients logged an average of more than 1,500 movements per hour while playing the game. Details on how this helps patients here: bit.ly/15IV0DP
/newmedia/mcp/osunch/2013/nov13/athometherapy/8-Images/1-Photos/06_Gauther_wide.jpg
Researchers hope to revolutionize rehab with some fun and games.
Lynne Gauthier, PhD, a therapist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, helped to develop a video game that is showing promise as a rehabilitation tool. While there have been other video games developed to help with rehab, experts here say this is one of the first to include input and direction from therapists and patients alike. Details here: bit.ly/15IV0DP
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The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
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The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
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